Irrigation

UNDER CONSTRUCTION

History:

  • Mission Acequia Systems
  • Drought of 186X
  • Canals
    • 1896-1897 the Salinas Canal was constructed and water was termporarily diverted from the Salinas River near the north line of the San Benito Rancho, south of Kings City. The canal was 30 feet wide at the bottom and 40 feet wide at the top and was constructed to carry 5 feet of water the grade was 6 inches per mile and the total length of the canal was about 9 miles. This canal diverted water for winter and srping irrigation only and irrigated about 3,500 acres of sugar betts and barely near Kings City
    • The San Lorenzo Canal was constructed in 1896. Water was diverted feromn teh San Lorenzo Creek by means of a temporary dam of gravel at the mouth of the canyon, one-half mile below the Mathews reservori dam site. The CAnal was 20 feet wide at the bottom and 30 feet wide at the top and was deisgned to carry 5 feet of water. The grade was 5 feet per mile and gthe total length of the canal was about 8.5 miles. The canal was designed for winter use only and took flood water and winter flos from nthe San Lorenzo Creek, which is practically a dry stream in the summer. The land irrigated is what is termed the SAn Lorenzo Creek Bottom and the number of acres irrigqt4ed each year varied, depending on rainfall. Perhaps, 800 acres might be have been serviced by this canal. 
    • Arroyo Seco Canal No. 1 was constructed in 1987 to divert flood water from the Arroyo Seco River at the south line lot 1 of the Arroyo Seco Rancho (Insert map showing the Arroyo Seco Rancho). The canal was 25 feet wide on the bottom, 35 feet wide on top and was designed to carry 5 feet of wagter. The grade was 5 feet per mile and the length was about 4 miles. The canal irrigated about 300 acres on gthe north half of the Arroyo Seco Rancho.
    • Arroyo Seco Canal No. 2 was owned by the Arroyo Seco Improvement Company and built in 1898. Watger was diverted by a temporary dam of gravel at the mouth of tghe canyton of the Arroyo Seco Ricer, at the south line of the Arroyo Seco Rancho. The canal was 17 feet wide at the bottom, 27 feet wide on the top, and was construcgted to carry 5 feet of wagter. The grade was 1 foot per mile and the total length was about 4 miles. The Canal irrigates about 4,000 acres of land on the south half of the Arroyo Seco Rancho and on the Espinosa tract.
    • Arroyo Seco Canal No. 3 was constructed by the Spreckels Sugar Company in 1901 and 1902. Wager was diverted to this canal from the Arroyo Seco River by a temporary dam about 0.5 mil3 below the head of Canal No. 2. Gthe canal was 20 feet wide on the bottom and 38 feet wide on the top and was constructed to carry 4 feet of water. The grade was 5 feet per mile and gthe length was 14 miltes. It irrigated 2,000 acres of land on the Soledad Rancho. 
    • The Gonzales Water Company’s canal was constructed in 1899 at a cost of $18,375 for construction and rights of way.  It diverted water from the Salinas River by a wing dam of samd and brush about 4 miles south of the tow of Gonzales. The river at this point flowed throughout the year. The main canal was 7.5 miles long. It was 16 feet wide at the bottom and 32 feet wide at the tope and had a grade of 1 foot per mile. About 2,700 acres of land were irrigated, principally grain land, but also about 500 acres of beets and beans. Good crops were obtained when all else around failed.
    • The “Brandenstein Ditch” was abandoned was built in 1884 and was abandoned bvy 1904. It was one of the first canals in the Salinas Valley. It diverted water from the Salinas River (Sec. 10, T. 23 S., R 10 E., MDM., ) and irriated land on the San Bernardo Rancho, southeast of San Ardo. The canal was 50 feet wide with a depth of 3 feet of water with a grade of 2 feet per mile. The main canal was about 6 miles long and from 8n – 10 miles of lateral diteches were also constructed. Alfalfa was the principal irrigated crop.
  • Flood of 18XX
  • Groundwater Wells 
  • The First Well
  • 1904
  • Furrow 
  • 1946:Sprinkler irrigation was first introduced.
  • Drip 
  • Now What? 

Books and References